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Evaluate 3.1.2

Evaluate 3.1.2

I have used surveymonkey to create an evaluation for students in the past.  It asked them what they would change about my teaching style, what they enjoyed about my teaching style, what their favorite way of learning was, what kind of learning opportunities they wish they had more of, and the like.  Our guidance department has also conducted similar evaluations school-wide to better find our focus for our staff development.  Sometimes it’s difficult to read the comments, but taken in context of providing the best experience for everyone makes it worthwhile.

Each year, we create a professional growth plan with goals for the year.  That has kept me accountable to setting goals to reach for.  From conferences, book studies, presenting at the state level, and interpreting data, the goals are opportunities for me to continue to learn and grow.  This year we moved from PAC to TKES.

Here’s a copy of my TKES evaluation from my principal this year:

TKES Eval  TKES Eval

Here’s a copy of my PAC Personal and Professional Growth Plan for last year:

PAC

 

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Evaluate 3.1.1

Evaluate 3.1.1

This is the spreadsheet I keep for the reading literacy course.  The data collected ranges from Lexiles, monthly County Benchmarks, AIMS/MAZE, Comprehensive Assessment of Reading Strategies (CARS):Evaluate 3_4

More importantly, digging deeply into those scores allows me to reach the root of any reading comprehension concerns.  For example, looking at the CARS score isn’t helpful, but looking at which reading skill isn’t being understood is.  Therefore, for each test, students chart out the test:

Evaluate 3_1

Now the student and I can see that after his first test (where 5 was the goal) he needs to focus attention on Conclusion/Inference, Fact/Opinion, and Figurative Language.  He only got 2 of the 5 questions correct for those three.  The monthly tests after that had one question for each of the 12 main reading skills.  If he improved, he moved on to another to another skill to practice.  If he did not, he went into the course to work on those skills again through different tutorials, games, video clips, and other media. 

Since each student kept a progress monitoring tool, they were able to know what group they’d work with the upcoming week, or what standards to practice in preparation for retests or one-on-one time with me.  I could quickly see that 7 students would need me to sit with them for main idea, 5 would work on www.mobymax.com for vocabulary, 3 would watch video clips for figurative language, and so on. 

Lessons were differentiated and individualized based on the data collected each month.  There was never a reason for students who mastered main idea to work through the lessons/folders on that skill.  They moved into the folders/coursework for their specific area of focus.

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Evaluate 2.1.2

Evaluate 2.1.2

Ideally, competencies should allow a student to view the skills they need to acquire, and then the student can select his or her own path through the course to gather the needed skills.

 Evaluate 2_1_2

This screen shot is taken from my current Reading Literacy course.  Students have specific reading skills they are working on to fill gaps in their reading comprehension.  On the far left, you’ll notice that I opened one folder to show student/grade level options for practice.  It includes Common Core Clinic pages, Daily Reading Practice (DRP), Jamestown nonfiction stories/questions/connections, and samples of CARS and AIMS that they will be progress monitored with throughout the year.  The Planner is updated each week to show students what assignments are due by the end of the week.  I update it each Friday, so they can work through the week-end for less work during the week if they choose.

This is one screen shot of our LMS, itslearning.  I also have a bulletin area, fast facts, and websites for each reading skill we work with in class.  Within each folder, the assignments are aligned to the CCGPS for quick access to a specific skill.

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Evaluate 2.1.1

Evaluate 2.1.1

The screenshots of the information and data pulled from the course are helpful in many ways.  First, I noticed that the screen showed who had completed Orientation.  When I taught online at Florida Virtual, it was imperative that the Orientation piece was completed before the first module was started.  Too often students did not follow directions, e-mailed assignments instead of using the dropbox, left messages with answers to discussion posts instead of adding to the thread, and had to have a quiz reset because they hit the backspace key and it ended the test before they were finished.  The Orientation is set to walk students through the best practices, and seeing it is completed allows me to move them forward.

Secondly, the Communication Log provided a trail of conversations over the course of the semester/year.  It also gives me one place to show parent, student, and stakeholder connections.  I can look back in the log to see if further conversations are needed and to refresh my memory of upcoming events the family may have shared with me that would in turn require me to modify due dates, call to check in after a surgery, plan ahead for extended absences due to traveling (having taught professional ballerinas and athletes), and update the log.  In addition to the phone/e-mail log, I would provide one night a month for a gathering in different parts of the state.  That way face-to-face would be an option. 

Next, monitoring student progress and teaching students to monitor that progress is crucial.  Some things within modules I’ve taught had to be done in a particular order, others did not.  Students liked when assignments disappeared from their “to do” or “inbox” area once dropped into a dropbox or when a quiz was taken.  I keep a spreadsheet and a timeline to show students where they should be throughout the course.  Some work ahead; some don’t.  Work past deadlines are highlighted in red and everything completed is yellow.  The visual sometimes helps students.  I’ve also “closed” the course for a student who has not been on pace in order to force the phone call or e-mail contact before reopening it. 

Finally, the assignment/feedback features have really made online teaching/learning more beneficial.  The communication back and forth during the retaking of a quiz or editing of an essay has been streamlined.  Even sites like Turnitin have played a big role in dissuading plagiarism.  These features also provide proof to look back upon during conversations with parents and students.

All of these methods allow me to connect with the student and family throughout the course, see patterns of learning and behavior, correlate attendance/time on task with grades/remediation efforts, and provide a successful environment for all.

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Evaluate 1.1.3

Evaluate 1.1.3

This is a screen shot of the progress monitoring file I keep for Reading Literacy.  Monthly benchmarking is completed to ensure gaps are being shortened and specific skills are growing towards mastery.  This is the students’ 5th academic class during the day.  After assessing the specific area(s) of reading that needs practice, students are evaluated on their progress monthly through universal tools.  Between monthly testing, students work through specific sites, with me, in a small group, through tutorials, with a peer, or through Jamestown and Academic Workout lessons.  If the monthly benchmarks are not improving the skills, the weekly practice activities are changed to find which will best fit the student.

evaluate 2

Also, within each score is the opportunity for specific feedback and conversation.  For example, the orange column for Comprehensive Assessment of Reading Strategies (CARS) tests is a final score of the 12 main reading skills each month.  If the score stays the same, but the student is not consistently missing the same item, then I need to pin point what skill to work on first.  If it’s always “main idea” that is missed, the learning can move in that direction.

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Evaluate 1.1.2

Evaluate 1.1.2

I believe that feedback needs to be consistent.  Therefore, I let my students know up front that they will get an e-mail response from me if they directly send me a personal e-mail or question me about an assignment within 24 hours.  Work that is turned in for grading and awaiting evaluation will be returned within 48 hours.  I also make sure students are aware of office hours and conference call opportunities while working through assignments or to reassess skills.

http://www.ion.uillinois.edu/resources/tutorials/pedagogy/feedback.asp provided an excellent look at how to meet the needs of students online.  The one piece I need to remind myself of from this source is that there is no need to comment on every single item.  There are times when discussion posts and blogs are moving forward and remaining on task by the students themselves.  If I’ve posted once, I can read with pleasure and see the learning unfold.

Here is a picture of an assignment I have marked for the student after summarizing nonfiction:

Evaluate0001

In addition to the hand-written comments, I would attach it to an e-mail.  This student, in particular, continually forgets to capitalize proper nouns.  He even forgets to capitalize his own last name.  In the e-mail, I will have him sign up for a time for us to talk about a mini-lesson on capitalization after he practices through BrainPop! and practices at least two games from the course.  I also want to make sure he understands the difference between listing key points and summarizing.

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Evaluate 1.1.1

Evaluate 1.1.1

I like to start the year off with learning inventories to better match the learner to their learning style.  When collecting formative assessment data, I want to provide choices.  Therefore, if I am testing the students understanding of conflict/resolution in nonfiction text, I would offer the following formative assessments:

  1. Discussion Post Prompt:  Describe a moment from your childhood when you got in trouble.   Write what your parent said you did wrong and what your punishment was. (From that post, I can see how well they can identify a problem and way the problem escalated to a climax and fell to a resolution.  For a follow-up discussion or blog, students can tie that experience to one from the nonfiction texts they are reading in class).
  2. https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.teachingchannel.org%2Fvideos%2Fclass-warm-up-routine&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AFQjCNFp-HRQD3uxBG2Rf8kAiJZXxVcKXQ also provides a great way to simply see if they understand the concept by holding up yes/no cards.  I would utilize this during a Skype session.  It allows students to think quickly and see what others responded with.  Then we can have discussion on those that were tricky to understand.
  3. Some students would prefer drawing out a comic strip showing the conflict/resolution.
  4. I use Safari Montage to add video clips or movie clips that spotlight conflict/resolution.  The narrator often slows down the clip to explain what’s happening.  Some students may wish to view it without sound and create their own dialogue that shows the conflict/resolution.
  5. Online formative assessments work well for quick checks throughout the reading selections.
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Create 4.1.2

Create 4.1.2

The first object I created was using goanimate.com.  I use this when working through the parts of speech lessons.  Students search for certain parts of speech (adjectives in this one) with Ninja Nina.  Sometimes she has them circle them with the stylus, take a screen shot, post it,  or add it to a container on another screen if there are more than one searches going on at the sametime.  Using a character throughout the course that students can connect to and think “oh, we’re on another grammar trek” is helpful.  I also use lots of containers that bounce the wrong items out (while playing a great Boing sound) or collect them if they are correct (with clapping as the sound), but they are in flipchart format through ActivInspire. 

http://goanimate.com/videos/0zRKLz4a6r0w

The second object I created was using quia.com.  When working with figurative language, I find games break up the poetry reading/writing nicely.  I have hangman, battleship, matching, and flashcards as choices in addition to the one I’m spotlighting below, which is Rags to Riches.

http://www.quia.com/rr/1009680.html

 

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Create 4.1.1

Create 4.1.1

Virtual Learning Objects

Three free tools:

1.  What2Learn allows you to create learning games.  You can create your own game and add your own vocabulary words or questions.  Simply choose a theme for your game (I chose Quiz Wars and Alien Abduction) and then it leads you into the prompts.  Hangman came up as the first choice.  There’s a game editor that checks your game out before loading it to ensure it meets the quality and rigor they’re looking for within the game.  You can also click on pre-made games for every subject and begin playing immediately.  I played through a Balloon Race game created for ESL students to practice irregular and regular verbs.  The site states that you can embed your game into your own site or play online.  User friendly!

2.   Learning Tools features the multimedia mindset.  It blends video, audio, images, and text together.  It can be used as teaching tools, storytelling pieces, or playing back information in a more innovative way.  It has a built in file uploader option. Users don’t need to use programmer tricks or steps; there’s an easy to follow demo.  I would use this to map out an entire novel.  Students can even watch video clips about the area/setting of the actual novel.

3.  ClassTools provides an area to create games, quizzes, diagrams, and activities.  They can be shared through a blog, website, or intranet.  You search for a template you like that matches your content and follow the steps.  They also have a facebook page of examples.  The games were fresh takes on content.  I would use the games and diagrams the most.  I would tie them to vocabulary in upcoming reading assignments and parts of speech.

Two fee/subscription based tools:

4.  Quia begins with a free 30-day trial.  $49 gets me a one-year subscription.  I can then create 16 different educational games, quizzes, or activities with 10 different question types.  There are also surveys and a huge data bank of items created by all users.  When I did use this, I found that students especially enjoyed the matching/picture game.   I enjoyed using this site for cause/effect and figurative language matching activities.  The flashcard area allowed for quick practice of new words and review before our story tests.

5.  Edhelper offers extensive reading options.  It spans math, reading, science, and social studies.  There are quizzes, reading comp. practices, vocabulary, crosswords, word searches, monthly themes, holiday themes, puzzles, organizers, and more.  It costs $39.98 for a full year subscription that includes all the site has to offer.  When I used this site in 6th grade, I found reading comprehension pieces that tied to our class reading for students to enjoy.  The extra practice was beneficial.  The ability to click on a button for a game/puzzle/activity to be print ready was a time-saver.  I could also put the link on my course web page.

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Create 3.1.3

Create 3.1.3

Topic:  William Shakespeare

Image was found on Flikr through Creative Commons:

 shakespeare

Once on the site, I clicked on the picture and it stated I was free to:

  • Share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format
  • Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material for any purpose, even commercially.
  • The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

Multimedia (Video and Webquest) from Teachertube:

www.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=278931

Resources, handouts, video, and content to enhance the lesson/research with students:

GAVS

http://www.gavirtuallearning.org/Resources/Shared9thLitComp(CopyMaster).aspx

 

 

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